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What is Acupuncture?

Acupuncture is an ancient form of healing which pre-dates recorded history.  The philosophy is rooted in the Taosit tradition which goes back over 8,000 years, making it the oldest continually practiced health care system in the world.

The goal of acupuncture is to encourage the body to heal on its own.  This is achieved by inserting sterilized, stainless steel needles (that are as fine as human hair) into specific points located on the surface of the body.  When these points become stimulated they have the ability to alter biochemical and physiological conditions in order to treat a wide variety of illnesses. 

Traditional Chinese Medicine views a person as an energy system in which body and mind are unified, each influencing and balancing the other.  Unlike Western medicine, which attempts to isolate and separate a disease from a person, Chinese medicine emphasizes a holistic approach that treats the individual.

According to ancient Chinese medical theory, there are 12 “meridians,” or pathways that run through the body. Blood, lymphatic fluid, and vital energy called “qi,” circulate through the 12 pathways.  Stress, traumatic injury and poor diet are just a few of the things that can cause the meridians to be blocked. When the meridians become blocked, pain and disease arise. Acupuncture can remove these blocks and restore health. 

From a Western medical perspective, recent studies have shown that acupuncture releases endorphins, decreases inflammation and increases T-cell count, which boosts the immune system.  A study at the University of Chicago had patients receive acupuncture while undergoing an MRI. Results show that certain areas of the brain become active when acupuncture needles are inserted at specific points.  The most advanced medical technology is now confirming theories that originated more than 5,000 years ago.